Science and Technology

The lesser long-nosed bat is an important pollinator of cactuses in the Southwest. (Courtesy of Bruce D. Taubert/Bat Conservation International)
April 18, 2018
Once endangered, the bat has been delisted and is now flourishing. Efforts such as Flowers for Bats will ensure the bat continues to thrive in the Southwestern U.S. and Mexico.
A flame skimmer dragonfly flits around Quitobaquito Springs in Arizona. (Image: Benjamin Wilder)
April 12, 2018
More than 150 scientists, students and volunteers participated in a "Border BioBlitz" that highlighted the diversity of the area through which the U.S.-Mexico border runs.
Catherine Brooks is associate director of the UA School of Information, which brings together faculty and students focused on various areas of information science, including virtual reality, artificial intelligence and machine learning. (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)
April 11, 2018
In a technology universe where there are more questions than answers, UA researchers are calling for a collective approach toward the thorny issues of data privacy, algorithmic discrimination and the spread of "fake news" online. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
A person with primary progressive aphasia activates part of the right-hand side of their brain (shown in blue) to decipher a sentence, whereas the normal person (left-hand image) does not. (Image: Aneta Kielar/University of Arizona)
April 11, 2018
People with a rare neurodegenerative disease called primary progressive aphasia may recruit intact brain areas for help with language, according to a study led by a UA scientist.
In 2017, Greg Barron-Gafford's research team began growing crops beneath 9-foot solar arrays at the UA's Biosphere 2. (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)
April 10, 2018
A project that involves growing plants beneath photovoltaic solar panels at Biosphere 2 is led by Greg Barron-Gafford in the UA School of Geography and Development.
A female Bombus impatiens (bumblebee) sonicating a deadly nightshade blossom in the UA EEB greenhouse (Photo: Keith Brust/Wildtime Media)
April 4, 2018
Many agricultural crops such as blueberries, chili peppers and tomatoes rely on bees that have adapted a vibration technique to access hidden pollen, researcher Stephen Buchmann says.
Selected brain scans from a new research paper on the causes of traumatic brain injury by Kaveh Laksari of the UA Department of Biomedical Engineering
April 3, 2018
New research led by the UA's Kaveh Laksari indicates that traumatic brain injury is caused by stretching and straining of tissue well below the surface of the brain.
Icarus is visible only because it is magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, located about 5 billion light-years from Earth (shown at left). The panels at the right show the view in 2011, without Icarus visible, compared with the star’s brightening in 2016. (Image: NASA, ESA and P. Kelly/University of Minnesota)
April 2, 2018
Visible only because it is magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, Icarus is 9 billion light-years away from Earth, making it the farthest individual star ever seen.
Wolfgang Fink: "Where does the human end, and the machine begin? Should robots have rights? This is what we will run into eventually." (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)
March 28, 2018
A manned mission to Mars can succeed only if no vital parts of the system break beyond repair — including those that are human. Technology will need to address issues before they occur, says UA professor Wolfgang Fink. With UANews video. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.

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