Recent News

Todd Vanderah and undergraduate researcher Angela Smith work in the lab.
Nov. 2, 2018
A $1.7 million federal grant will help researchers striving to put an end to opioid tolerance — a phenomenon that often leads to opioid dependence, abuse and addiction.
Ronald A. Wilson will oversee the Title IX program at the UA.
Nov. 1, 2018
The University of Arizona has announced the hiring of Ronald A. Wilson as Title IX director.
Nov. 1, 2018
The American College of Surgeons awarded a Level II Pediatric Trauma Verification to the Trauma Center at the Banner – University Medical Center Tucson.
The standard blood pressure cuff may get an upgrade thanks to research that could lead to the development of continuous, cuffless and non-invasive wearable blood pressure monitors.
Nov. 1, 2018
A lab simulation model of an artificial artery demonstrates pulse wave velocity is a feasible measurement for monitoring blood pressure. Wearable patches show promise for measuring PWV, making them a potentially inexpensive blood-pressure monitoring option.
Nov. 1, 2018
While the United States is one of the largest tomato producers in the world, imports play an important role in satisfying demand for fresh tomatoes since most U.S. production is destined for the processed market.
Oct. 30, 2018
A top-10 ranking by the UA space science program led a strong overall showing by the university in the U.S. News & World Report 2019 Best Global Universities rankings.
Using motion capture technology, the movements of a professional dancer are transformed into a virtual representation of African dances for use in online courses.
Oct. 30, 2018
The UA Center for Digital Humanities is using technology to create new opportunities to study who we are, where we came from, and ultimately what it means to be human.
A caterpillar of the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) readies to devour a boll of cotton. (Photo: Wenxue Pan/Nanjing University)
Oct. 29, 2018
Researchers have pinpointed a dominant genetic mutation that makes cotton bollworms, one of the world’s most destructive crop pests, resistant to genetically engineered cotton.
Napping may not be universally beneficial for young children, new research suggests.
Oct. 29, 2018
New research suggests that typically developing young children retain new information better after taking a nap, but the opposite is true in children with Down syndrome.

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