Water

Jennifer Moscato said the Underwood Family Sonoran Landscape Laboratory was a significant source of inspiration for her team's 2018 Liba Wheat Memorial-award-winning project. (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)
March 27, 2019
In "Building a Changing World," the UA College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture's studies of the built environment include how future urban design and planning projects must work hand in hand with surrounding natural environments.
Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona. (Photo: Luca Galuzzi - www.galuzzi.it, CC BY-SA 2.5)
March 20, 2019
Three UA professors, each with unique areas of expertise relating to water and the Colorado River, talk about the Drought Contingency Plan and what might come next.
March 20, 2019
Department of Defense funding will allow a team of researchers led by chemical and environmental engineering professor Reyes Sierra to advance groundwater purification methods.
Chris Scott's visits to the Himalaya region now focus on both science and policy. (Photo: Courtesy of Chris Scott)
March 20, 2019
Udall Center for Studies on Public Policy Director Christopher Scott believes in the benefits of using science to inform policy and bringing policy into scientific research.
March 19, 2019
UA researchers have developed a number of promising solutions and inventions that are ready for companies to adopt and take out into the world.
Marla Smith-Nilson, center, meets with a community group in a slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital city, where millions lack access to clean water. (Photo: Water1st International)
March 18, 2019
Marla Smith-Nilson shares experiences combating gender inequality and leading an international nonprofit that supports sustainable water and toilet projects for the world’s poorest communities.
Feb. 28, 2019
The UA has been recognized by the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities as the world's No. 1 program in water resources. The UA also placed in the top 50 for library sciences, communications, earth sciences, ecology and public administration.
The growth of forest trees in temperate and boreal regions became more limited by water rather than temperature as the 20th century warmed. The more orange-red the area on the map, the more trees in that region became limited by water availability. (Image: Flurin Babst, Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL)
Jan. 16, 2019
The changes are most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes, reports a team that includes UA scientists from the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research.

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