Q&A

John Cocke (Photo courtesy of Nathaniel Johnston/njohnstonphotography.com)
Feb. 8, 2019
In 1969, UA scientists were the first to detect the optical flash from a pulsar — a stellar corpse thought to pack at least one-and-a-half times the mass of our sun into a neutron star.
Andrew Coan
Jan. 28, 2019
A professor from the UA James E. Rogers College of Law focused his research on special prosecutors and their role in the U.S. government, and along the way uncovered some fascinating stories about the history of the position.
Tools of the trade: translation headphones await participants in a business conference room.
Aug. 1, 2018
Properly trained interpreters and translators have never been in more demand. The UA National Center for Interpretation strives to produce professionals to meet the needs of an increasingly interconnected world.
June 14, 2016
In an era of high-tech educational materials for very young children, three researchers weigh in on the continued importance of nursery rhymes in learning language skills.
April 26, 2016
Scholars investigating the historical and contemporary influence of magic will meet at the UA to explore the topic and how it has impacted medicine, society and scientific research.
Feb. 11, 2016
Monday marked the much-anticipated opening on campus of the First Folio exhibit commemorating the work of the great playwright. Jessica Maerz, Brent Gibbs and Meg Lota Brown discuss his impact and influence.
March 17, 2015
UA entomologist Dawn H. Gouge answers questions associated with one of our most familiar avian neighbors: pigeons. They are "a pest we volunteer for," she says.
March 21, 2014
Thirteen UA students are serving as legislative interns through a program organized by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Spending the spring semester in Phoenix, the students are writing speeches, attending committee meetings and hearings, conducting research, summarizing and presenting bills and preparing amendments, among other things, while working with elected officials, journalists and members of the governor's office.
Feb. 26, 2014
Have you ever wondered why February got shorted a few days? John Bauschatz and Cynthia White, both faculty members in the UA Department of Classics, provide some historical context about the 28 days, connections with the agricultural season, rational for the occasional leap year and the likelihood that we will see any significant calendar changes in the future.

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