Phoenix Mars Lander Working With Sticky Soil

The lander continues to explore its polar world, but it's somewhat tricky business.
July 28, 2008
Phoenix Mars Lander collected a soil sample and attempted to deliver some of it to a laboratory oven on the deck during the mission's 62nd Martian day, or sol, (July 28, 2008). The sample came from a hard layer at the bottom of the "Snow White" trench and might have contained water ice mixed with the soil. This image taken after the attempt to deliver the sample through the open doors to cell number zero on the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer shows that very little of the soil fell onto the screened opening. Not enough material reached the oven, through a funnel under the screen, to proceed with analysis of the sample material.

Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 7:54 a.m. local solar time on Sol 62. The size of the screened opening is about 10 centimeters (4 inches) long by 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) wide.
Phoenix Mars Lander collected a soil sample and attempted to deliver some of it to a laboratory oven on the deck during the mission's 62nd Martian day, or sol, (July 28, 2008). The sample came from a hard layer at the bottom of the "Snow White" trench and might have contained water ice mixed with the soil. This image taken after the attempt to deliver the sample through the open doors to cell number zero on the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer shows that very little of the soil fell onto the screened opening. Not enough material reached the oven, through a funnel under the screen, to proceed with analysis of the sample material. Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 7:54 a.m. local solar time on Sol 62. The size of the screened opening is about 10 centimeters (4 inches) long by 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) wide.
NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander started its 62nd Martian day, or sol, (July 28, 2008) with an empty scoop, then collected material expected to be icy soil and attempted to deliver some of the sample to a laboratory oven on the deck. This image taken after the scoop had been inverted and a motor in the scoop had been run to jar sample material loose, shows that much of the sample remained stuck inside the scoop.Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 8 a.m. local solar time on Sol 62. The width of the scoop is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches).
NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander started its 62nd Martian day, or sol, (July 28, 2008) with an empty scoop, then collected material expected to be icy soil and attempted to deliver some of the sample to a laboratory oven on the deck. This image taken after the scoop had been inverted and a motor in the scoop had been run to jar sample material loose, shows that much of the sample remained stuck inside the scoop.Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 8 a.m. local solar time on Sol 62. The width of the scoop is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches).

Scientists and engineers on NASA's Phoenix Mars Mission spent the weekend examining how the icy soil on Mars interacts with the scoop on the lander's robotic arm, while trying different techniques to deliver a sample to one of the instruments.

"It has really been a science experiment just learning how to interact with the icy soil on Mars how it reacts with the scoop, its stickiness, whether it's better to have it in the shade or the sunlight," said Phoenix Principal Investigator Peter Smith of The University of Arizona.

The team tried two methods over the weekend to pick up and deliver a sample of icy soil to a laboratory oven of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. In both cases, most of the sample stuck inside the lander's inverted scoop.

Images returned early Monday showed a small amount of soil reached the screened opening, but other data indicated that not enough had been funneled into the oven for beginning an analysis of the composition.

Samples obtained Friday and late Sunday contained material churned up from a hard layer by the motorized rasp on the scoop. That layer is believed to include water ice mixed with the soil.

Sunday's attempt to deliver a sample to cell number zero of Phoenix's TEGA instrument used more vibration with a motor inside the scoop and held the scoop upside down over the opened doors for longer than was used on Friday. The team plans to keep gaining experience in handling the icy soil while continuing with other Phoenix studies of the soil and the atmosphere.

Smith said, "While we continue with determining the best way to get an icy sample, we intend to proceed with analyzing dry samples that we already know how to deliver. We are going to move forward with a dry soil sample."

The Phoenix mission is led by Smith of the UA with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and development partnership at Lockheed Martin, Denver. International contributions come from the Canadian Space Agency; the University of Neuchatel; the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark; Max Planck Institute, Germany; and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.