The Arizona Assurance program was established in 2008. This weekend, the third class of scholars will graduate (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo)
The Arizona Assurance program was established in 2008. This weekend, the third class of scholars will graduate (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo)

Third Arizona Assurance Cohort Set to Graduate Saturday

Arizona Assurance makes higher education degree attainment a reality for low-income Arizona residents.
May 14, 2014
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About Arizona Assurance:

  • The program was founded in 2008 by then-UA President Robert N. Shelton as a financial assistance and retention program.
  • Students whose family income is no more than $42,400 can apply.
  • The program relies on a number of sources to ensure that students can graduate without debt, including the federal Pell Grant, work study positions and other paid work and also gift support.
  • In the program, students receive structured programming around academic support and are paired with a mentor.
  • Open to Arizona residents, the program offers low-income students with four years of funding, so long as they meet the program requirements each year.
  • The first class began in 2008 with nearly 600 enrolled. About 30 percent of the class graduated within a four-year period; about 37 percent of the second class graduated within four years.
  • During the spring of 2013, Arizona Assurance opened up its mentorship program to students who are not in the scholarship program, expanding access to mentoring to the general student body.
Submit photos and follow the UA's commencement ceremony via Twitter using #BearDownLife.
Submit photos and follow the UA's commencement ceremony via Twitter using #BearDownLife.
In honor of the donors who have supported Arizona Assurance, the program's staff, in partnership with the UA Foundation, unveiled the new Arizona Assurance Tribute Wall. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo)
In honor of the donors who have supported Arizona Assurance, the program's staff, in partnership with the UA Foundation, unveiled the new Arizona Assurance Tribute Wall. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo)
Arizona Assurance was created to support Arizona students and their families. "It is pretty touching to see how dedicated these students are to their own success," said Christine Salvesen, director of UA Academic Success & Achievement and Arizona Assurance. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)
Arizona Assurance was created to support Arizona students and their families. "It is pretty touching to see how dedicated these students are to their own success," said Christine Salvesen, director of UA Academic Success & Achievement and Arizona Assurance. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)

Arizona Assurance, the University of Arizona's promise to financially support Arizona families experiencing barriers to higher education, is graduating its third cohort of students on Saturday.

The donor-supported institutional financial aid and student retention program helps ensure that low-income Arizona students can get a UA education debt-free.

The program's third graduating class began in 2010, earning their degrees within four years, representing a promise the UA made to the state in 2008 that it would support low-income Arizona families so students could have an opportunity to graduate without student loans.

"That is absolutely amazing. The whole idea and design of Arizona Assurance was to make sure that these students graduate in four years," said Christine Salvesen, director of UA Academic Success & Achievement and Arizona Assurance.

"It is pretty touching to see how dedicated these students are to their own success," Salvesen said. "With the University meeting them halfway, with financial supports and networks, these students are able to succeed over and over."

Departments and colleges have begun to offer additional support to scholars, Salvesen said. Also, Arizona Assurance staff members partner with other UA offices and programs, including the federally funded TRiO Program, New Start, Career Services, Think Tank and others. 

Also this month, in honor of the donors who have supported Arizona Assurance, the program's staff, in partnership with the UA Foundation, unveiled the new Arizona Assurance Tribute Wall, located near the ballrooms of the Student Union Memorial Center. The wall honors each donor who contributed at least $100,000 the program, which is accepting gift support.

"The program has taken full bloom," Salvesen said.

Lindsay Santana – who graduates Saturday with a double major in family studies and human development and speech, language and hearing sciences – said the benefits of being part of Arizona Assurance extend to her family. 

"Arizona Assurance allowed me to attend a university without the constant worry and stress about how I was going to pay for tuition," Santana said. "It allowed my parents and I to have an easier transition into the college lifestyle. Being a part of Arizona Assurance allowed me to instantly feel part of the University."

Santana was paired with mentor Michelle McKelvey, assistant director of Arizona Assurance, and said her mentorship has been especially valuable. 

McKelvey, who has supported other students, said that in only six years, Arizona Assurance has shown that the investments of the University and donors has benefited not only the institutions and its students, but the state. She also noted that high school counselors are helping spread the word about Arizona Assurance and encouraging students to apply to the UA.

"As a university, we are working hard to get students to graduate, and to be able to support students who are minority, often first-generation and considered low-income, and to see them succeed. It speaks to the importance of the UA providing finding and support to these students," she said. "We are making a cultural change across the state of Arizona, saying that if you invest in students and support them, there is a huge return."

Bryanda Acuña, who graduates this weekend with a degree in family studies and human development, also could not afford to attend the UA, but applied anyway. Soon after being accepted, she learned that she would be an Arizona Assurance scholar.

That letter would launch Acuña's academic career and professional development. She secured an internship working with therapeutic animals, worked with a respite home provider with families whose children are autistic and spent last summer studying Spanish in Chile.

Acuña also helped to establish and eventually served as president of the Cubs to Wildcats club through Arizona Assurance, a group that informs K-12 students about college.

"Only four years, to do all that," Acuña said, reflecting on her own achievements with some surprise.

"Besides all the educational knowledge, the family studies program is incredible and gave me a foundation for any field I want to go into," Acuña said. "It was the best decision I ever made."