An artist's rendering of the new Biosciences Partnership Building in downtown Phoenix.
An artist's rendering of the new Biosciences Partnership Building in downtown Phoenix.

UA Breaks Ground on Downtown Phoenix Project

The Biosciences Partnership Building, due for completion in two years, will add to the UA's presence and serve the next generation of health professionals.
Oct. 16, 2014
Turning the dirt on Oct. 16 were (from left) Dave Elrod of DPR Construction; Dave Crawford of Sundt Construction; Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton; UA President Ann Weaver Hart; Phoenix Councilwoman Kate Gallego; and Dr. Joe “Skip” Garcia, UA senior vice president of health sciences.
Turning the dirt on Oct. 16 were (from left) Dave Elrod of DPR Construction; Dave Crawford of Sundt Construction; Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton; UA President Ann Weaver Hart; Phoenix Councilwoman Kate Gallego; and Dr. Joe “Skip” Garcia, UA senior vice president of health sciences.

With shovels full of dirt, construction has been launched on the 10-story Biosciences Partnership Building, the latest University of Arizona project in downtown Phoenix.

UA President Ann Weaver Hart and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton ceremoniously tilled the soil, marking the beginning of the two-year design and construction for the 245,000-square-foot research building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

“This building will foster collaborations with scientists that will lead to more cures, better treatments and bring more federal and private dollars to the state,” Hart said. “We will pursue expanded partnerships with industry that we hope will lead to groundbreaking discoveries in the areas of neuroscience, cardiovascular and thoracic science. This building will allow us to further these efforts and, ultimately, improve lives."

The research building will sit just north of the Health Sciences Education Building on the downtown campus.

“This building will serve the medical school and beyond with important research and faculty to teach the next generation of health professionals,” Stanton said. “Of course, this just adds to the economic vibrancy of downtown. The research facility initially will bring construction jobs and then high-paying, research-related jobs, including specialized technicians and other support staff for faculty and scientists.”

Construction on the $136 million building is expected to translate into nearly 500 jobs initially and an additional 360 permanent jobs at build-out.

"The Biosciences Partnership Building represents yet another milestone as the city and the University develop a major academic medical center in downtown Phoenix," said Dr. Stuart D. Flynn, dean of the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix. "Research in this building, in collaboration with our partners, will advance health care for all and expand our role as an economic driver for the city, Valley and state."

In 2012, the Health Sciences Education Building opened, housing health education for both the UA and Northern Arizona University. Construction continues on the UA Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s. The cancer center, a 220,000-square-foot outpatient and research facility, is scheduled to be completed in 2015.

The Phoenix Biomedical Campus also is home to the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health as well as the colleges of nursing and pharmacy. Also on campus are NAU programs for physician assistants, physical therapists and occupational therapists as part of the university’s College of Health and Human Services. Arizona State University’s School of Nutrition and Health Innovation is housed in the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative 1 building southwest of the education building and immediately south of the Translational Genomic Research Institute.

The funding for the Biosciences Partnership Building comes from economic and educational development bonds approved by the Arizona Legislature in 2008 that paid for construction of the Health Sciences Education Building and related campus improvements. Research focus areas include neurosciences, health care outcomes, cancer and precision medicine.