With music, art, discussion and other creative forms, the UA is celebrating National Arts and Humanities Month during October.
With music, art, discussion and other creative forms, the UA is celebrating National Arts and Humanities Month during October.

UA Events Celebrate Arts and Humanities Month

Creative disciplines will be featured throughout October, exploring different cultures, languages and ideas.
Oct. 5, 2015
What: 
Humanities Week
When: 
Oct. 5-9
Where: 
Multiple locations
The month's events include a celebration of the Moon Tree, located on the UA campus between the Kuiper Space Sciences Building and the Flandrau Planetarium and Science Center. The sycamore has been part of the UA campus since it was planted in 1976. NASA documents it as one of only 64 surviving moon trees around the world.
The month's events include a celebration of the Moon Tree, located on the UA campus between the Kuiper Space Sciences Building and the Flandrau Planetarium and Science Center. The sycamore has been part of the UA campus since it was planted in 1976. NASA documents it as one of only 64 surviving moon trees around the world.
During Humanities Week, UA assistant professor David Gramling will present "Man vs. Machine: Translation in the Digital Age." The talk will be held Oct. 7 at 5 p.m. at the UA Poetry Center.
During Humanities Week, UA assistant professor David Gramling will present "Man vs. Machine: Translation in the Digital Age." The talk will be held Oct. 7 at 5 p.m. at the UA Poetry Center.
Caleb Simmons, an assistant professor of religious studies, will present "Divine Romance: Love, Sex and Religion in Indian Ballads" on Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. at the Poetry Center.
Caleb Simmons, an assistant professor of religious studies, will present "Divine Romance: Love, Sex and Religion in Indian Ballads" on Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. at the Poetry Center.

National Arts and Humanities Month was established by Americans for the Arts to encourage a nationwide celebration of arts and culture in October.

"Every stroke of the brush, stitch of the needle or moment of the memoir uniquely marks our society and contributes to our national character," President Barack Obama wrote about National Arts and Humanities Month. "This month, we recognize the ways the arts and humanities have forever changed our country, and we recommit to ensuring every American has the opportunity and the freedom to question, discover and create."

The University of Arizona is hosting dozens of events offering an exploration of contrasting cultures, international languages and divergent ideas.

"Humanities celebrates and expands our ways of understanding the world we live in," said Mary Wildner-Bassett, dean of the UA College of Humanities. "We celebrate to encourage community members to connect to the work and joys of humanities ideas as a lifelong participation in their personal and local civic lives."

UA alumnus Alberto Ríos, Arizona poet laureate, was scheduled to kick off Humanities Week on Monday with a discussion about his experience working on the Spanish libretto for Arizona Opera's "Arizona Lady," which was written in 1953 as a love letter to the Southwest. Nine other Humanities Week events are on the calendar, all in the Rubel Room at the UA Poetry Center, located in the Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St.

Also scheduled Monday, Malcolm Compitello, head of the UA Department of Spanish & Portuguese, was to present "Los Indignados: Spain and the Occupy Movement" and discuss the origins of the Occupy Movement, which was motivated by a number of acts of resistance to political and economic abuses around the world.

Other UA events during National Humanities Month include:

Oct. 7: David Gramling, an assistant professor of German studies, will present "Man vs. Machine: Translation in the Digital Age," at 5 p.m. at the UA Poetry Center.

Oct. 7: Don Traut, a UA music theory professor, will present "Can’t Get You Out of My Head!" with ethnomusicologist Dan Kruse and Andrew Lotto, a speech, language and hearing professor. The presentation on "ear worms," or involuntary musical imagery, is part of the Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry's Show & Tell @ Playground series. The 6 p.m. event will be held at the Playground Bar & Lounge, 278 E. Congress St. 

Oct. 9: Tony Bennett, one of the most eminent singers in American popular music, is the season opener for the UApresents 2015-2016 season. The performance will be held at Centennial Hall at 8 p.m.

Oct. 14: At 5 p.m., the Poetry Center's A Closer Look Book Club will host a conversation about Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima."

Oct. 16: Friday Night Art will be held from 5-7 p.m. at the UA Museum of Art, 1031 N. Olive Road. The event will include a telescope viewing and educational activities with the National Optical Astronomy Observation. Also, the Confluencenter's senior fellow/pianist Paula Fan will present "Le Travail de Peintre," transporting the audience to Paris in the Golden Twenties.

Oct. 17: "Rome Poems — An Evening of Poetry" will be held at 5 p.m. at the Poetry Center. The event is being held in conjunction with the "Rome: Legacy of an Eternal City" exhibition at the UA Museum of Art.

Oct. 23: Albert Welter, head of the Department of East Asian Studies, will present his talk, "The Future of China’s Past: Looking Into the Meaning of China’s Rise." The 1:30 p.m. event will be held in the Kiva Room of the Student Union Memorial Center, 1303 E. University Blvd.

Oct. 27: Jerome Rothenberg, an internationally celebrated poet, translator and performer with more than 90 books of poetry and 12 assemblages of traditional and avant-garde poetry, will present a 7 p.m. reading at the Poetry Center. The event is co-presented with the American Literary Translators' Association.

Oct. 30: Jack Roosa, son of Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa, is among those who will speak during a celebration of the campus Moon Tree, an American sycamore grown from a seed that traveled to the moon on the Apollo 14 space mission. The special program will be held at 4:30 p.m. in the Kuiper Space Sciences Building auditorium, 1629 E. University Blvd. The celebration will be followed by a 6 p.m. screening of "Desert Moon" and a star party on the UA Mall. Events are free and open to the public. 

Also, the UA is hosting the American Literary Translators' Association conference Oct. 28-31. Hundreds of literary translators, writers, students, readers, teachers, publishers and other professionals will attend the conference, which is dedicated exclusively to the work of literary translation.

"The translator is a mediator of understanding across cultures and across cultural boundaries," Wildner-Bassett said. "Translation is not simply replacing one word with another. It includes cultural and personal nuance that shapes understanding, opinions and attitudes to make global intercultural understanding possible."