UA Scientists To Discuss New IPCC Report On Climate Change in Teleconference

Feb. 1, 2007
Projected June-July-August temperature changes for 2091-2100. The changes are relative to 1971-2000 averages. Credit: J.L. Weiss, UA.
Projected June-July-August temperature changes for 2091-2100. The changes are relative to 1971-2000 averages. Credit: J.L. Weiss, UA.

The University of Arizona will hold a teleconference Friday, Feb. 2, at 10 a.m. Tucson time (noon Eastern time) about the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report scheduled to be released in Paris early that morning.

The teleconference will feature UA geoscientist Jonathan Overpeck, a coordinating lead author, Chapter 6 (Paleoclimate). Overpeck will be calling from Paris, where he was involved in writing the report. Overpeck is a UA professor of geosciences and director of the UA's Institute for the Study of Planet Earth.

The teleconference will last from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Reporters can either attend the teleconference in person or call in.

Two UA scientists will be available in person to discuss some aspects of the IPCC report and how climate change will affect our region:

-- Julia Cole, UA associate professor of geosciences, is a contributing author for the paleoclimate chapter (Chapter 6) of the forthcoming IPCC report. Her expertise includes large-scale climate systems such as El Nino and monsoons, and the paleoclimatic record of megadroughts in the Southwest.

-- Travis Huxman, UA assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, studies large-scale changes in ecosystems, particularly in arid environments, and how changes in climate can affect them.

The IPCC, a group representing over 180 governments, operates under the auspices of the U.N. Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organization. It commissions assessments of global climate change by hundreds of scientists who are experts in the field. The group is now issuing the fourth in a series of periodic assessments. The most previous IPCC report was issued in 2001.

The upcoming report, which focuses on the science of climate change, is expected to present expert consensus on greenhouse gas levels, global land and ocean temperatures, sea level rising, changes in sea ice and predictions of future change.

The summary for policymakers to be issued Friday will provide an updated assessment of the extent of human contributions to global warming.