The U.S. Green Building Council Arizona is honoring the Old Main renovation and restoration project for its outstanding leadership and innovation in raising the bar for sustainable building design, and for gaining LEED certification. (Photo credit: John de Dios/UANews)
The U.S. Green Building Council Arizona is honoring the Old Main renovation and restoration project for its outstanding leadership and innovation in raising the bar for sustainable building design, and for gaining LEED certification. (Photo credit: John de Dios/UANews)

US Green Building Council to Recognize Old Main

The UA's Old Main, which went through an extensive remodeling and renovation completed in 2015, will receive an award during the U.S. Green Building Council Arizona's fifth annual Heavy Medals Luncheon.
April 17, 2017
Extra Info: 

The USGBC Arizona award recipients will be honored during an April 19 luncheon to be held in Tempe. Other Arizona Leader Award recipients are:

  • Innovative Design, New Construction: Northern Arizona University Student and Academic Services Building
  • Climate Champion: Northern Arizona University International Pavilion
  • Community Champion: ASU Sun Devil Fitness Complex, Downtown Phoenix Campus
  • Green Schools: Phoenix Coding Academy
  • Judge’s Choice Award: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona
What: 
USGBC Arizona
When: 
April 19, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: 
Salt River Project’s PERA Club, 1 E. Continental Dr., in Tempe, Ariz.

The project team responsible for the renovation of Old Main, the University of Arizona's centerpiece and historic building, is being recognized with a leadership award by the U.S. Green Building Council Arizona.

Already certified LEED silver, Old Main will receive the 2017 USGBC Arizona Leader Award for Building Performance during the Arizona chapter's Heavy Medals Luncheon, to be held April 19 in Tempe, with UA and Sundt Construction, Inc. representatives in attendance.

"The success of the Old Main renovation was a result of Sundt and the University of Arizona's joint commitment to building sustainably. We're honored to have USGBC Arizona recognize this signature project for our community," said UA alumnus Daniel Osterman, the Sundt preconstruction project manager.

Sundt, the general contractor for the building renovation, was able to merge the existing structure, constructed in 1891, with safety upgrades, a new mechanical system and replace plumbing, light and electrical systems. Architectural firm Poster Frost Mirto Inc. was also on the Old Main renovation team. 

The Arizona chapter's award was granted for the project's "significant increase in building performance through the implementation of sustainable design solutions," according to the Arizona council, which is dedicated to transforming the building and construction market through its LEED green building program and other efforts meant to advance a sustainable future.

Others at the UA who are planning to attend the ceremony are Peter Dourlein, the UA's assistant vice president of Planning, Design and Construction, and facilities project manager Lorna Gray.

"This project is a testament on what a truly collaborative team can deliver," said Rodney Mackey, the UA's associate director of Planning and Public Private Partnerships, who will attend the event.

Old Main's renovation was completed in 2014. The historic structure was stabilized, restored and brought up to current code compliance. Its useful and functional life has been extended through these efforts.

In addition to LEED certification, the Old Main renovation project received the 2015 Governor's Heritage Preservation Grand Award; the Tucson-Pima County Historical Commission's Historic Preservation Award; the Design-Build Institute of America's Western Pacific region Design-Build award; and the National Award of Merit in Rehabilitation, Renovation and/or Restoration from the Design-Build Institute of America.

"The award from USGBC is also a testimony to the University's commitment to being a good steward of the dollars we spend on buildings and our commitment to minimal energy use," Mackey said.